The Rules: Advantages, Blessings and Wyrd   Leave a comment

Advantages
Heroes can gain temporary Advantages, usually during a Suspense scene. These can grant bonus dice. Invoking an Advantage causes it to vanish, however. Examples include “Flirted with the Duchess,” “Cased the Scraver Headquarters” or “The Most Fashionable Outfit.”

Checking off an Advantage grants two bonus dice.

[Stole this from either FATE, with player-created Aspects, or from Cortex Plus, with Assets generated by the players. Either or.]

Blessings
Heroes have Blessings, special abilities that define their characters. Blessings do not always mean literal invocations of the Creator’s favor. Being strong, beautiful, having friends in low places, lots of liquid cash or the ability to move objects with your mind are all considered Blessings.

A Blessing will typically have a standard use and an augmented use. A standard use means the Hero can use an ability or overcome a difficulty in some special way. An augmented use can grant bonus dice or break the rules. Augmented use of a Blessing requires a Wyrd point to activate.

[Psychic and theurgic powers are examples of Blessings. So are exceptional strength, lots of friends in low places or Second Republic technology.]

Wyrd
Wyrd is the special energy of fate that makes the Heroes Heroic. The Church teaches that it is an emanation from the Creator and proof of his divine guidance over us all.

A Hero may use a Wyrd point to do the following:


  • Uncheck a Condition outside of an Interlude scene;

  • Uncheck an Aspect outside of an Interlude scene;

  • Reduce a Vice by 1 (thus increasing its corresponding Virtue);

  • Activate the augmented use of a Blessing;

  • Add one bonus die to a roll.

[Which reminds me: I need to be more generous in giving out Wyrd. As a GM, I tend to be a stickler for immersive gameplay. I should be rewarding instances of the roleplaying I want to see with Wyrd. Entertaining dialogue, strong emoting, adding details to the setting, even little in-character gestures while we’re sitting at the table: Wyrd point, every time.

Stinginess with Wyrd points is a bad habit, stemming from my days as a more adversarial GM. I don’t want to make things hard for the players by denying them resources. I want to make things hard for the players by overwhelming them with resources and then forcing them to spend. Lack of options makes players throw up their hands. An abundance of options in the face of a dilemma makes them sweat.]

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Posted September 15, 2011 by John Perich in Uncategorized

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